Remember, you can be a feminist AND feminine!

10/22/2018
English

Since the Italian fashion designer Maria Grazia Chiuri became Dior’s artistic director, she's taken a stand, using fashion as a platform to talk about feminism.

She opened her 2016 show with a T-shirt bearing the slogan “We should all be feminists.” In the S/S’18 collection, there was the typical Breton white t-shirt with blue stripes, and on it, the question “Why have there been no great women artists?”, taken from an essay written in the 70’s by art historian Linda Nochlin. Chiuri also used Niki de Saint Phalle’s colourful creations and quotes in Dior’s Summer’18 collection. Saint Phalle was a French-American painter and sculptor who championed women’s rights.

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The designer received the award for Positive Change at the 2017 Fashion Awards in London, because of her “contribution to female empowerment in the fashion industry and her determination to encourage women of future generations to believe in themselves.” At the ceremony, Maria Grazia said: “The feminist movement that has been mine for the longest time has finally struck a resonant chord in society, and this recognition sends a powerful message to all women battling on a daily basis.”

Now, Dior’s Fall’18 collection honored the 1968 protests and students' march that happened in Paris to fight against, among other things, inequality of the sexes. At that time, women depended on their fathers and later, their husbands, for absolutely everything, they could not even open a bank account on their own. At work, they were not allowed to wear trousers! It took the 60's revolution to start shaping women’s rights and the way we live and dress now.

50 years later, Maria Grazia Chiuri is still battling using her weapons, that is, fashion, because as it was explained at Dior’s Fall’18 show: “changing the world also means changing clothes.”

The Italian designer says she wants to offer wearable clothes to all types of women, with different bodies, different nationalities, and cultures. And for her latest show at the Musée Rodin, the 60’s were very much present in details such as patchwork or floral dresses, minis, peace signs, doves, clogs. The runway and walls were covered with vintage images and women’s rights slogans. Chiuri explained in an interview that the word feminism wasn't used in fashion because it had a negative image; “The problem sometimes comes from women themselves. They say, 'Oh no, I'm not a feminist.' But do they know what it means? The word means equal opportunity. You can be both feminist and feminine. Why not?”

The stereotype of feminists being angry women with short hair, no makeup and dressed as men, makes no sense in today's world. And remember girls, please, being a feminist means fighting for equal opportunity, it does NOT mean getting wasted, cursing and objectifying men, behaving as bad as the worst male chauvinists. You're supposed to fight them, not become one of them!

So now you know it; you can champion women’s rights and equal opportunity while looking fabulous, and you have a good excuse to do some shopping at Dior ;)

Since Maria Grazia Chiuri has become Dior’s artistic director, she has  combined fashion and feminism.

In 2016’s show there was the T-shirt with the slogan “We should all be feminists”, in the S/S’18 collection, there was the typical Breton white t-shirt with blue stripes, and on it, the question “Why have there been no great women artists?”from an essay written in the 70’s by scholar Linda Nochlin. Chiuri also used Niki de Saint Phalle’s colourful creations in Dior’s Summer’18 collection. Saint Phalle was a French-American painter and sculptor who championed women’s rights.

 

The designer received the award for Positive Change at the 2017 Fashion Awards in London,because of her “contribution to female empowerment in the fashion industry and her determination to encourage women of future generations to believe in themselves”. At the ceremony Maria Grazia said: ““The feminist movement that has been mine for the longest time has finally struck a resonant chord in society, and this recognition sends a powerful message to all women battling on a daily basis”.

 

Now, Dior’s Fall’18 collection honored the 1968 protests and students march that happened in Paris to fight against, among other things, inequality of the sexes. At that time, women depended on their fathers and later, their husbands, for absolutely everything, they could not even open a bank account on their own and they where not allowed to wear trousers at work! It took a “revolution” in the 60s to start shaping women’s rights.

50 years later, Maria Grazia Chiuri is still fighting using her own weapons, that is, fashion, because as they said in the show: “changing the world also means changing clothes”.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Take a look back to a time a half-century ago when revolutionary thoughts and actions were placing the power and energy of youth center stage and influencing generations to come. For Autumn-Winter 2018-2019, #MariaGraziaChiuri tapped into this anniversary, reinventing and reimagining the legacy of those heady times. #DiorAW18

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Photos by WGSN