Editors' Corner

Valentino & Sofia Coppola To Collaborate For La Traviata

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Photo via vogue.com
Photo via vogue.com

Last weekend, the crème de la crème of fashion world and, partly, also cinema/theatre world came together to survey the outcome of an (Italian) culture collaboration par excellence. That is to say that some time ago Giancarlo Giammetti and Valentino Garavani decided to support the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma – and together with Sofia Coppola, daughter of the grand film director Francis Ford Coppola and a multi-media talent herself, produced Verdi’s La Traviata. To make it short, Valentino designed the costumes together with his heirs Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli and Coppola took the reigns in terms of direction. Out came a weekend sparkling with Italian extravaganza, nostalgic aesthetics and sensual indulgence.

On Saturday evening guests, who had flown in from all imaginable places of the world, were invited for dinner at the magnificent Palazzo Doria Pamphilj, as is known the biggest privately owned building in Rome – and that’s saying something. Entering via the stone staircase of the Palazzo, they strolled down the ever-impressing, Caravaggio-studded Saletta del Seicento, breathed in the air of a dozen splendidly lit mirror and picture galleries and finally ended up in the high-ceiling salons where the banquet was set to take place. Candlelight, crystal glasses (or shall I say goblets?) and lush flower arrangements of jasmine and palms produced an ambience free of worries that only ever exists in retrospection.

In the subsequent night, Sunday evening, the weekend’s originator and highlight was to take place and La Traviata premiered with applauso forte at the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma, although critics were divided. Attendees, among whom Keira Knightley, Diane von Furstenberg, Monica Bellucci and yes, Kim and Kanye, could be counted wore black tie and, as anticipated, the stage was not the only venue of delicate attire. The Teatro dell’Opera was thronged with flamboyance, most of which paid some homage to the house of Valentino – but this salmagundi of satin, silk, tulle and ruffles was nothing compared to the beauty of the overture scene, in which the Violetta floatingly descended down the sky high staircase in a robe of black gloss and mallard green ruffles.

For the rest, not much needs to be said, but to be shown. The gallery will give you a good impression of what we’re talking about… 

 

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